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Review: TryBit Logic

January 9, 2019
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If you own a Nintendo Switch and like puzzle games then perhaps you will find this article is right up your alley.  There is a title, Trybit Logic, currently sitting on the eShop that, I have to admit, I had never even heard of (perhaps we have Nintendo to thank for that due to their horrible eShop interface) that you can grab up for the low price of $6.99.  This game completely slipped under my radar and thank goodness NEP GK, the public relations representatives for the game’s developers (HIMACS) as well as being responsible for localizing the game, reached out to us with a review copy of the game, otherwise I may have never heard of this at all!

The premise behind Trybit Logic is quite simple…although solving the puzzles after a while can be quite challenging.  You are tasked with deleting out bugs that contain bits (think along the lines of binary) where a bit is represented by either a “0” (indicating it is off) or a “1” (indicating it is on).

The tools you will utilize are what’s called logic operators such as “OR” and “NOT”.  If you are into programming, like myself, then you will be incredibly familiar with logic operators.  Each bug contains 4 bits and can be in any combination of “1’s” and “0’s” such as 0110.  You will then have to use your tools to either make each bit in the bug all “0’s” or all “1’s”.  The “OR” tool is usually comprised of “0’s” and “1’s” in any combination just as the bugs are but usually they are in such a pattern that they will make the bug bits all “0’s” or “1’s”.

Most times the “OR” pattern will not necessarily help this and is the exact opposite of what the “OR” pattern needs to be in order to take out the bug for example a bug being “0110” and the “OR” pattern being “0110” when it needs to be “1001”.  This is when the “NOT” tool comes in which when placed on the “OR” tool will reverse it so in the example I just demonstrated it will then make the “OR’s” “0110” pattern into the needed “1001” to take out the bug.

There is an extra element of complexity in the later puzzles where your bugs and tools are stacked.  The catch here is that you cannot move a tool diagonally onto another tool or bug but only those tools residing right next to (either on the sides of or above or below) the intended target can be used.  If you ever find yourself stumped by a puzzle there is a hint button but be warned; if you use it, it will detract from your overall score on that puzzle which is represented by 5 stars.  When you use a hint, it will subtract a star from your overall score.

Another mode other than “Puzzle” is “Defense” mode in which you are face with bugs advancing from the right side of the screen moving towards the left.  If any bugs reach BITROBO, the robotic character on the left side, it is game over.  You will have a toolbar located at the bottom in which you will have to place “AND”, “OR”, “NOT, or “XOR” logic operators or combine them and place them in front of the bugs as they advance.  According to the help guide within the game, these are the explanations for each logic operator:

  • OR – Enemy bits can’t be turned ON.  If there are any ON bits in OR, enemy bits on the same position will be turned ON.
  • NOT – Bits can be reversed.  ON bits will be turned OFF and bits that were OFF will be turned ON.
  • AND – Enemy bits can be turned OFF.  If there are any OFF bits in AND, enemy bits on the same position will be turned ON.
  • XOR – When “only one side ON” is used, the enemy and your own bits can be turned ON.  Any other bits will be turned OFF.

Sounds simple right?  Well, it is actually quite challenging even for a programmer like myself.

The only thing I found I thought that could be better is that when selecting tools, you use a hand pointer which you hover to the tool, select it, and drag it on top of the intended target.  This might work for PC but when playing on a console it can be a bit tedious.  Fortunately, the game takes advantage of the Nintendo Switch’s touchscreen and you can use your finger to drag and drop making gameplay a little faster than using the pointer.

The soundtrack, aside from the gameplay, really caught me off guard.  It is incredibly upbeat; sounding very techno which adds that element engagement that keeps the game moving along.

Trybit Logic is a game that many have never heard of but one that I would recommend picking up, especially with it being fairly cheap on the eShop.  It is a great game that you can play in short chunks and offers quite a bit for the low asking price.  If you would like to try the game out for free prior to picking it up on the Switch, it is also available on iOS and Android devices.

Have I convinced you to try out Trybit Logic?  Have you already played it?  Let us know in the comments below and be sure to take a minute and visit us in our Community forums for more great Nintendo conversations!

Nintendo Playroom would like to personally thank NEP GK (who handled the localization for TryBit Logic) for supplying us with a review copy of the game!

SourceCode, aka Lucas Hughes, is the creator/owner of Nintendo Playroom.  He spends his days primarily as a husband/father/programmer/gamer.  He loves all things Nintendo and is very passionate about the Nintendo community.

Gameplay
7
Music and Sound
8.5
Graphics
7
Controls
7.5

Total Rating

7.5
Tags:
SourceCode

SourceCode, aka Lucas Hughes, is the creator/owner of Nintendo Playroom.  He spends his days primarily as a husband/father/programmer/gamer.  He loves all things Nintendo and is very passionate about the Nintendo community.

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