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NSFW Reviews: South Park – The Stick of Truth

January 8, 2019
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One of the first things my wife learned about me was my love for (read addiction to) video games. To my undying gratitude, rather than curb my predilections, she embraced them, creating many cheerful memories not only of finally besting a game, but doing it in front of a celebratory audience.

Well, today’s review, and several upcoming reviews in a series which I will call the NSFW series– Not Safe For Wives – is of a game that due to its content my wife was not able to partake in as a spectator. That game: South Park – The Stick of Truth.

Now don’t get me wrong, my wife is not a prude and has previously watched South Park and laughed at it. However, this game is an episode of South Park with all pretensions of plot development and good taste set to one side leaving it as a blank canvas for Matt Parker and Trey Stone to deliver the comedy for which they are known, without being diluted.

That comedy moves from the crude, to the scatological, to the prurient, to the near unmentionable, all at an exponential rate. If you are a fan of South Park and aren’t averse to the boundaries of good taste and proper upbringing being challenged to and beyond breaking point, you’ll have a hard time not laughing out loud at the dialog, locations and plot of this game. It’s essentially a ten-hour long episode of South Park that you can watch and interact with at your leisure.

Gameplay

As some may have noticed, my review style does not include revealing anything even slightly spoilerific, so I’m not going to talk about the basic story line, or reveal any characters beyond saying everyone you’d expect to see in a ten-hour long episode are going to make an appearance as will many of the plot elements of the earlier seasons of South Park, either as game critical upgrades or Easter eggs.

The game itself borrows its mechanics from Paper Mario both in terms of the exploration elements and the combat system. Like Paper Mario combat is turn based with damage and defense enhancements through timed button challenges.

Unlike Paper Mario, the combat is rather unchallenging with the first deaths not likely to come for a long time into the game, and then after that, only on rare occasions. It is almost as if the developers were having so much fun putting the game together they forgot it also needed to be a playable game. That said, it’s unlikely if you happen to have bought this game you bought it with the intention of having your gaming skills challenged, and believe me, you probably won’t be bothered about that not occurring in any event.

Like most RPGs you will have your share of boss fights to contend with, and with this game, some of the more memorable fights – you’ll know what I mean when you get to them. And it’s not because they are hard – they aren’t.

Graphics

The game looks and feels exactly like an episode, so resolution, frame rate, rendering and draw distance aren’t going to be selling points. Accordingly, the game as would be expected performs as it should.

Overall

If you can put to one side the lack of challenge in the game – and you should be able to – the Stick of Truth is enormously entertaining, and at a low price point, decent value for money, particularly if you are able to pick it up on sale.

I give it a 7.6 out of 10. Good but not great.

Full-time lawyer and dad, part-time gamer when the former allow.

Gameplay
6.5
Music and Sound
9.0
Graphics
8.0
Controls
7.0

Total Rating

7.6
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John Smith

Full-time lawyer and dad, part-time gamer when the former allow.

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