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First Impressions Of Mega Man 11

September 26, 2018
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So wait, are you telling me that Capcom remembers they have a game older than Street Fighter II? Did they finally take some members off the Resident Evil 4 porting team and put them to work on new assets? If that’s the case, then it’s a shame we won’t see RE4 on Switch or Fitbits or whatever, but a new Mega Man is far more than welcome. Around the time Mega Man was announced for Super Smash Brothers, I decided to jump into the series with the first game on the Famicom. You know, get a feel for what the series is all about; maybe play the first three games and that’s it. Some 40 plus games and a replica Arm Cannon later, I think you can safely call me a Mega Man fan. So I’ve been looking forward to getting my hands on Mega Man 11, the first wholly new Mega Man game since Wiiware was regularly getting games. But with a shift in series management (and a shift from pixels to polygons), the question hangs over the game: Is Mega Man 11 good?

Going by the recently released eShop demo, Mega Man 11 is shaping up quite nice. It’s got that drum tight platforming that characterizes classic Mega Man. That’s commendable for a 2.5D game. Creating the exact same physics of one game in a completely different engine and with completely different hardware is like getting a microwave dinner to look how it does on the box. Mega Man 11 also nails the level design. It’s just as difficult as any other game in the series, but never unfair. In a typical Mega Man, the tools at your disposal play a big part easing the challenge. But that’s only if you are clever enough to use them in the right ways. Like using Rush Coil to skip over difficult parts of the stage, or using the Pile Driver to dash over pits. The new Double Gear System fits nicely into this. The Blue Gear is for slowing down time, which can lead to easier ways to get past more difficult problems. I rarely found myself using the red gear, which boosts attack power, but the blue one saved me a ton of trouble.

I could continue to sing praises, sure, but Mega Man 11 doesn’t completely pass this fan exam. The main problem I have is the audio. The music isn’t quite great, and the voiceover work is fairly annoying. It might just be me,  but I don’t think exertion noises and shouting “Rush Coil” immerses me more into the game. I can turn that down, so no harm, no foul. But the music I don’t really want to turn down. Mega Man is not a game to be played silently. If Mega Man was an album, it would be a grand rock opera. Mega Man 11’s Block Man Stage track is your friends garage band. Still better than total silence, but not ideal.

 

These complaints are but tiny burn marks on a lovely homemade donut. At the end of the day, the demo did its job: it let me experience what makes the game so good and made me want to buy the full release. If you’re a Blue Bomber addict like me, then Capcom has delivered what you need. If you’re new to Mega Man, then what are you doing? Download this demo and see what you’ve been missing. I don’t even have a clever way to put that, just do it. Even you, Tim. You know who you are.

 

 

HautDeForme is a collector, a self proclaimed historian, and most of all, a player of video games. When he’s not writing about that, you can find him writing music for no particular reason and advocating for the localization of Mother 3, whether people listen or not.

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HautDeForme

HautDeForme is a collector, a self proclaimed historian, and most of all, a player of video games. When he's not writing about that, you can find him writing music for no particular reason and advocating for the localization of Mother 3, whether people listen or not.

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